Above: The progression of varicose veins from asymptomatic to ulcer.

Above: The progression of varicose veins from asymptomatic to ulcer.

Varicose Veins:

Chronic venous insufficiency is 2 times more prevalent than coronary heart disease (CHD) and 5 times more prevalent than peripheral arterial disease (PAD).

  • Varicose veins may be more than just a cosmetic issue
  • Varicose veins affect BOTH men and women
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WHO IS AT RISK FOR CVI

CVI can affect anyone; gender and age are factors that may increase your risk. For example, women older than 50 are more likely than others to develop CVI.  Other factors that may increase your risk, include:

  • Family history
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Trauma
  • Prolonged Standing
  • Obesity or excess weight
  • Current or previous pregnancies
  • Smoking

PREVENTION

For mild forms of CVI, lifestyle changes may be recommended to control existing symptoms and prevent others. The following measures may help prevent varicose veins and CVI.

  • Manage body weight
  • Exercise regularly, focusing on exercises that work your legs (run or walk)
  • Elevate your legs whenever possible
  • Avoid prolonged standing or sitting
  • Avoid clothes that are tight around the waist, groin or legs
  • Avoid shoes that limit use of calf muscles (i.e., high heels)
  • Eat a diet low in salt and rich in high-fiber foods

TREATMENTS

Varicose veins are often misunderstood as a cosmetic problem and many people living with them do not seek treatment.  The good news is that there are minimally invasive treatment options available for varicose veins and CVI.

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Learn about your options:

Venous ablation: